SWALLOWING THE ANCHOR

October 13th, 2013 No comments

October 8, 2013 was Kent’s birthday and unlike last year which was spent off a little beach on the island of Mallorca in the Spanish Mediterranean this birthday was notable for finalizing the sale of DESTINY.

The birthday boy. . .October 8, 2012

The birthday boy. . .October 8, 2012

They say that the two happiest days in a sailor’s life are when he buys a boat and when he sells it.  In this case, it was bittersweet since we have decided not only to sell DESTINY but that our future “destiny” is land-based.

So we have “swallowed the anchor” and are becoming “dirt dwellers”.  Friends who have gone before us in making this transition are good role models.  There is “life after cruising”–although we haven’t ruled out “land cruising” at some point.

Kent has some trouble leaving his "baby"

Kent has some trouble leaving his “baby”

Just days before the DESTINY sale was completed we also sold the condo that has been our land base in Marblehead, Massachusetts.  We are now making our US base in Missoula, Montana where we have owned property for the past several years.

We are planning to spend several months in Panama this winter exploring the country and looking for a winter home.  Summers will be spent in the “Big Sky” country of Montana where Kent hopes that he will have more luck at fly fishing than he did at ocean fishing.

DESTINY was a wonderful boat that took us to places we never imagined we would go.  Now our destiny takes another turn, but the ADVENTURE continues.  We will miss all our sailing friends but can’t wait to see where we will be next year on Kent’s birthday.

The adventure continues!

The adventure continues!

Categories: USA Tags:

DESTINY FOR SALE –Broker Info

June 9th, 2013 No comments

It’s a BRISTOL day when the sails are full. . .

DESTINY is now on the hard at Bert Jabins Yacht Yard, 7310 Edgewood Road, Annapolis and available for viewing through Keith Mayes at Annapolis Yacht Sales.  Contact info for Keith is as follows: Office–410-267-8181×204; Cell–301-503-4634; Email–[email protected].

See www.annapolisyachtsales for specs and tab at top of page.

SERIOUS INQUIRIES ONLY.

DOIN’ THE CHARLESTON

May 3rd, 2013 No comments

We recently spent a week in Charleston at the Charleston Maritime Center in the heart of the historic waterfront.                        

Destiny at Charleston Maritime Center on Cooper River

Charleston Maritime Center is on the Cooper River

“Doin’ the Charleston” was the name of the tour we took to get an overview of the city and its history from Marvin its loqacious, charming driver/guide.

Meet Marvin in the straw hat holding court on the Battery

Meet Marvin in the straw hat holding court on the Battery

Marvin is a Charleston native who gave us the “Southern” view of the “War between the States”.  You see, here in the South, and Charleston is its epitome, there was no Civil War.  To admit there there was a “civil war” would make the Southerners “uncivil” and that will not do.

Our tour with Marvin explored all aspects of Charleston’s history starting with the Revolutionary War and George Washington’s visit to the city after its successful conclusion.  Apparently, the City of Charleston hired a noted portrait artist, named Trumbull to paint a portrait of Washington in honor of his visit.  The portrait produced by Trumbull showed Washington in battle and did not acknowledge Charleston, so the city refused to accept it.  Since a large commission was involved, Trumbull did another portrait at the behest of the city.  The second portrait portrayed Washington in a very statesman-like pose, but the horse was turned around with tail raised as only a horse can do just before. . .well you can guess. . .and under the horse’s rump was the City of Charleston.   Having seen the portrait, we can attest that Trumbull got the last laugh.

In fact, the house where Washington slept during that visit is now a museum.  The Hayward-Washington House from the pre-Revolutionary period is an imposing three story brick home in the Federalist style with a formal garden in back and a separate building for the kitchen, laundry and housing servants. 

This is a view of the house where Washington slept froom the formal garden. . .

This is a view of the house where Washington slept from the formal garden. . .

but from the house you barely see the secondary dwelling. . .

but from the house you barely see the secondary dwelling. . .

where servants. . .make that slaves. . .prepared meals and did laundry.

where servants. . .make that slaves. . .prepared meals and did laundry.

Charleston, with its large natural harbor has been an important strategic location in the Revolutionary War, the War of 1812 and of course the Civil War (OK, I’m a Yankee at heart and refuse to call it the War Between the States).

 A short ferry ride takes you to FortSumter, occupying most of a small island at the entrance to the harbor.  We visited Fort Sumter with friends Beverly & David Kennedy.

Fort Sumter appears so small to be important as a defensive position.

Fort Sumter appears so small to be important as a defensive position.

On the way to Fort Sumter. . .Hear no Evil, See no Evil, Speak no Evil :)

On the way to Fort Sumter. . .Hear no Evil, See no Evil, Speak no Evil :)

The fortress manned by the Federal government at the time of South Carolina’s secession in 1861 prompted the first shots fired in the Civil War.  Today, FortSumter is a national monument that bears flags from every occupation and the tattered Stars & Stripes that flew over it at the time of its surrender to the South are preserved in museums.

We saw cannons that defended the Fort. . .

We saw cannons that defended the Fort. . .

and one of the remnants of an original flag that flew over it when the Civil War commenced.

and one of the remnants of an original flag that flew over it when the Civil War commenced.

At the time of the Civil War, residents of Charleston viewed the military action from the roofs of stately homes lining the “Battery” on the south end of the peninsula.  The Battery was a defensive line of artillery that protected the city.  Today you can walk along the sea wall that was previously occupied by cannons. 

The citizens of Charleston watched the war from their roofs and piazzas.

The citizens of Charleston watched the war from their roofs and piazzas.

The Citadel was the South’s equivalent of West Point during the Civil War.  While the Citadel still exists as an exclusive boy’s school, it has a new campus and the former Citadel and its parade ground are is an upscale hotel and city park respectively. 

West Point graduated the great generals of the Civil War. . .but the South produced the Citadel.

West Point graduated the great generals of the Civil War. . .but the South produced the Citadel.

The steeples of Charleston are impressive and dot the flat skyline.  

Charleston makes a stunning backdrop for a pleasure boat. . .

Charleston makes a stunning backdrop for a pleasure boat. . .

I was particularly intrigued by a LutheranChurch that faces the old parade grounds of the Citadel and the interesting sign at the cemetary of another. 

This is St. Matthews German Evangelical Lutheran Church. . .  I didn't know Lutherans were "evangelical".

This is St. Matthews German Evangelical Lutheran Church. . . I didn’t know Lutherans were “evangelical”.

St. Phillips Church on the other hand. . .

St. Phillips Church on the other hand. . .

has a very spiritual invitation to offer.

has a very spiritual invitation to offer.

Seaside parks now line the shore, with fountains that provide cooling relief in the hot summer months and Charleston is filled with hidden and public gardens which are bursting to life with color in the spring.

Shaded walks and fountains are inviting

Shaded walks and fountains are inviting

but secret gardens. . .

but secret gardens. . .

offer brilliant flowers against lush boxwood. . .

offer brilliant flowers against lush boxwood. . .

she love me., or not, daisies. . .

she love me., or not, daisies. . .

and Charleston's famous magnolias.

and Charleston’s famous magnolias.

Charleston architecture is very formal, neo-classical and rigidly balanced.  Faux doors are incorporated into rooms to create balance where none exists, except in the architect’s mind.  Floor plans of historic buildings show two halves of a building to be a mirror image.  If there is a rounded façade on one side of the building, the other will have the same.  A prime example is the CustomsBuilding which has elaborate steps and columns on both the front and back of the building.  Although, I’m not really sure which is the front. 

The front or the back. . . of the Customs House.

The front or the back. . . of the Customs House.

Oh yes, and in Charleston they do not have porches, they have piazzas.  And the piazzas often have faux entry doors that open onto what we Northerners would call a “porch” that then has a formal entry door off the piazza.  Are you confused yet? 

This is the upper piazza. . .not porch on a lovely Charleston house.  Note the elaborate detail.

This is the upper piazza. . .not porch on a lovely Charleston house. Note the elaborate detail.

Each floor of the house has a piazza, but faux front doors add privacy to the first floor. . .

Each floor of the house has a piazza, but faux front doors add privacy to the first floor. . .

which you can see from this view. . .note the sky blue "piazza" ceiling and the "real" front door.

which you can see from this view. . .note the sky blue “piazza” ceiling and the “real” front door.

A large fleet of tall ships make Charleston their home, and several were docked at the CharlestonMaritimeCenter while we were berthed there.  One in particular was a Swedish training ship that kept its sailors (many of them young women) very busy repairing rigging. 

Charleston tall ships. . .

Charleston tall ships. . .

training ships like this Swedish square rigger docked at the Maritime Center. . .

include training ships like this Swedish square rigger docked at the Maritime Center. . .

with sailors at work on the rigging.

with sailors at work on the rigging.

Patriots’ Point was directly across from the MaritimeCenter with the retired aircraft carrier, Yorktown as its primary attraction.

This a view of the Yorktown taken from the Ft. Sumter ferry.

This a view of the Yorktown taken from the Ft. Sumter ferry.

Getting around Charleston is very easy.  You have your choice of carriages or trolleys.  We opted for the FREE trolleys. 

There are private carriage tours. . .

There are private carriage tours. . .

group carriage tours. . .

group carriage tours. . .

or the FREE and reliable green trollies.

or the FREE and reliable green trollies.

Fine restaurants abound, particularly in the French Quarter—yes, French Huguenots escaping religious persecution in France occupied Charleston in Colonial times.  We highly recommend Pearlz Oyster House on East Bay Street—the sliders stacked with three fried oysters are delicious.

Vendue Street in the French Quarter is lined with inns.

Vendue Street in the French Quarter is lined with inns.

Most of Charleston is not more than three stories.  There is a row of townhomes called “Rainbow Row” for its sherbet-like pastel fronts. 

A small peak at Rainbow Row

A small peak at Rainbow Row

As for souveniers, I am partial to baskets and these are very authentic.

Seagrass baskets are available on Market Street.

Sweetgrass baskets are available on Market Street.

One final word about Charleston.  The women are very SOUTHERN.  By that I mean they wear tailored dresses and high heels all day, everyday and are for the most part slender, with long blonde hair.  Well, almost all.

Charleston rocks!  If you enlarge this you weill see yellow finger nails as well as tri color hair, but I love the leggings!

Charleston rocks! BTW she has yellow finger nails as well as tri color hair, but I love the leopard leggings!

One final note.  The 1920′s dance craze, the Charleston, has its roots here with a Black minister, an orphanage he founded and its band, but you have to come and take Marvin’s Doin’ the Charleston tour to find out the details.

Categories: ICW, USA Tags:

WHERE IN THE WORLD IS DESTINY?

April 15th, 2013 No comments

OK, I’ve been very lax in keeping the blog updated, and I felt a little guilty when a blog follower posed this question recently.

Truth is that Destiny has moved from one hemisphere to another since the last post on Ibiza.  We spent a delightful fall season in Menorca and Mallorca before Destiny shipped from Palma to West Palm Beach in late October, 2012.

Cala Coves is a small harbor on Menorca that is famous for caves. . .

Cala Coves is a small harbor on Menorca that is famous for caves. . .

and primative carvings.

and primative carvings.

Mallorca had its share of small anchorages with remote beaches that could only be reached by boat.

Jolie enjoyed the tiny beach at Cala Calobra on the north coast of Mallorca near Soller. . .

Jolie enjoyed the tiny beach at Cala Calobra on the north coast of Mallorca near Soller. . .

but also thought the scenery at Soller was pretty spectacular.

but also thought the scenery at Soller was pretty spectacular.

To recap all our adventures in the Spanish Balearic Islands is impossible. . .but I am certain we will return at some point to this magical part of the world.

We made wonderful friends, Carol and Pat Kelly in Soller on the north coast of Mallorca and visited their lovely home in Deia.  

Soller is a charming village on the north coast of Mallorca with a protected harbor. . .

Soller is a charming village on the north coast of Mallorca with a protected harbor. . .

where we met Pat Kelley on his Hinckley Southwest 50 yawl. . .two flag blue boats with American flags caused quite a stir in Soller.

where we met Pat Kelly on his Hinckley Southwest 50 yawl. . .two flag blue boats with American flags caused quite a stir in Soller.

We toured the sites of world famous Palma known for its quiet sophistication and world class restaurants and outdoor cafes.

One of Palma's many street cafes. . .

One of Palma’s many street cafes. . .

had the added attraction of street performers. . .music and movement, all very sensual.

had the added attraction of street performers. . .music and movement, all very sensual.

Palma is a world class port, with impressive architecture.

Palma's Gothic Cathedral is surrounded by lush gardens, walkways and fountains. . .

Palma’s Gothic Cathedral is surrounded by lush gardens, walkways and fountains. . .

and dominates the harbor even from this birdseye view.

and dominates the harbor even from this birdseye view.

Then as fall approached, Kent readied Destiny for shipping arranged by Peters & May.  Next thing we knew Destiny was offloaded in West Palm Beach in early November, and we were back in the good ole USA.

A typical day in the ICW off West Palm Beach is CRAZY!!!

A typical day in the ICW off West Palm Beach is CRAZY!!!

We wintered on the East coast of Florida, visiting and making friends along the way.  Thanks to the hospitality of Rick Howard we spent a pleasant Thanksgiving in Vero Beach and were welcomed by Mike Bachman for Christmas and New Years in Stuart, Florida. 

 

Christmas at Mike's Place. . .Creekside south.

Christmas at Mike’s Place. . .Creekside south.

 

Our impression of Florida has definitely changed having spent the last several months traveling down and now up the coast.

But selling Destiny is still a priority so now we are heading north to the Annapolis area to take advantage of the spring selling season there.  We have been on board for about 13 months now except for brief breaks and are looking forward to heading to Montana for a couple of months this summer.

Our trip north, primarily on the ICW is quite a different experience for us.  First of all the water is shallow and there are lots of bridges.  The channel is narrow so it keeps us on our toes.  We had become accustomed to the deep water of the Med and adjusting to the fathometer reading 5 ft. or less is unnerving.

We know the bridge has clearance of 65 ft. and our mast is 61 ft. but as you approach it doesn't seem possible that we can clear.

We know the ICW fixed bridges have clearance of 65 ft. and our mast is 61 ft. but as you approach it doesn’t seem possible that we can clear.

The wild life is amazing—manatees, dolphins, hawks and eagles inhabit the area. 

Pelicans seem to guard every bridge. . .

Pelicans seem to guard every bridge. . .

 

while Manatees appear to be kissing as they come alongside. . .

while Manatees appear to be kissing as they come alongside. . .

but the "wildlife" at the famous Dixie Crossroads Restaurant in Titusville is very tame.

but the “wildlife” at the famous Dixie Crossroads Restaurant in Titusville is very tame. . .they are famous for red shrimp.

Titusville, where we spent several days this week is a 20 minute drive from the Kennedy Space Center, which is “out of this world”.  The interactive exhibits and IMAX productions were amazing.  We rode in a Mars landing craft and shuttle simulators and saw distant galaxies through the Hubble telescope in a 3-D IMAX film, along with our friends, Bill and Jean on Soliel Sans Fin who just returned from the Med this fall too. 

The entrance to the Kennedy Space Center.

The entrance to the Kennedy Space Center includes a moving tribute to the former President.

We made a simulated landing on Mars. . .

We made a simulated landing on Mars. . .

and we both tried our hand at landing the space shuttle. . .crashes!!!

and we both tried our hand at landing the space shuttle. . .crashes!!!

Not all the action at the Kennedy Space Center was serious.

Friend Jean took this picture as we were "trapped" in a mirror maze at the Angry Birds in Space exhibit.

Jean took this picture as we were “lost” in a mirror maze at the Angry Birds in Space exhibit.

Our trip north will take us through St. Augustine, Savannah and Charlestown—all promising new experiences, but I have to admit that I miss the Med, the culture and our many friends in the cruising community.  More adventures to follow.

Categories: Uncategorized Tags:

SAILING THE ICW. . .REALLY!

April 14th, 2013 No comments

April 9, 2013 was a perfect day in all respects as we headed from an anchorage off Dragon Point near Eau Gallie, Florida to Titusville approximately 30 NM north on the ICW.

 

Destiny in the ICW with a happy captain. . .actually sailing.

Destiny in the ICW with a happy captain. . .actually sailing.

The day started with a blue sky tinged with pink as the sun rose.  The wind was light from the SE but picked up later in the day giving Kent the opportunity to sail more than half of the 5-6 hour trip.  

Jean on Soliel Sans Fin captured some amazing pictures of Destiny that day.

 

See got this panoramic shot of us with a bridge in the background. . .

Jean got this panoramic shot of Destiny with a bridge in the background. . .

 

and another couple as we approached a bridge. . .

and another couple as we approached a bridge. . .

yes, we made it. . .with inches to spare.

yes, we made it. . .with inches to spare.

It is really nice to be traveling with someone so handy with a camera.

Here we are anchored after a long day.

Here we are anchored after a long day.

Thank you, Jean for these memories.

Categories: Florida.ICW, Uncategorized, USA Tags: