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BODRUM. . .AND BACK

The entry to Bodrum’s inner harbor is dominated by St. Peter’s Castle which divides the two bays around which Bodrum fans out. 

St. Peter's Castle sits at entrance to Bodrum Harbor

St. Peter's Castle sits at entrance to Bodrum Harbor

Harbor entrance and anchorage outside

Harbor entrance and anchorage outside

The Bodrum Milta Marina is very upscale, with prices to match.  Anytime there is a swimming pool at a marina you can expect to pay premium prices. 

Castle is backdrop for Bodrum Milta Marina

Castle is backdrop for Bodrum Milta Marina

View of Castle from Marina Pool

View of Castle from Marina Pool

St. Peter’s Castle was built during the Crusades in 1402 now houses the Museum of Underwater Archaeology and its many displays, including a full size reconstruction of the stern of a 7th Century Roman ship discovered off the Turkish coast.  There are displays of gold jewelry, amphorae, bronze and glass all recovered from the sea and covering thousands of years of civilization. 

Under this castle entrance passed Knights of the Crusades

Under this castle entrance passed Knights of the Crusades

The Castle has many towers and lush landscaping

The Castle has many towers and lush landscaping

 

. . .not to mention stunning views from ramparts

. . .not to mention stunning views from ramparts

Harbor entrance from castle

Harbor entrance from castle

Ancient urns in replica ship hold--one of many exhibits in Archaeological Museum

Ancient urns in replica ship hold--one of many exhibits in Archaeological Museum

After one night in the marina (at Croatia prices 64 euros for Destiny) we picked up a mooring off the castle for a second night.  From there we could easily dinghy ashore for food (there was a harbor front Burger King) and Jolie walks.  The beauty of the castle lit at night made up for the Euro beat music emanating from several competing discos on shore.  And yes, we did have Burger King sandwiches for dinner.

View from Destiny's mooring

View from Destiny's mooring

Burger King even has a seaside terrace--that's Destiny in the background

Burger King even has a seaside terrace--that's Destiny in the background

Bodrum was the first major city we visited since arriving in Turkey, and it was fun to see the Eastern influence in architecture, restaurants and clothing.  Although Turkey is a Muslim country with over 90% of its population avowing to be religious, it has a notable secular influence.  While call to prayers is evident as elsewhere we have been, the dress for the most part is fake designer wear.  Kent and I speculated that Turkey would never become part of the EU because it would mean giving up their substantial trade in knock off designer goods—everything from handbags to clothing.

Typical shopping street in old town

Typical pedestrian shopping street in old town

After two days in Bodrum that included provisioning and touring the Castle, we headed south on the afternoon breeze.  The wind was West at 15-17 kts. and we were making over 8 kts. at times approaching the north side of the Datca Peninsula.

 

Kent enjoys the sailing in Turkey

Kent enjoys the sailing in Turkey

We anchored off Mersincik, which is somewhat protected from the prevailing wind.  We had hoped to tuck into a small cove that was nearby but found it chock-a-block full of boats—many even larger than Destiny.  Surrounded by cliffs that soared 2,500 ft. in the air and olive groves, it was a sweet spot to spend the night. 

No room in this cove

No room in this cove

Kent and Jolie go ashore in Mersincik

Kent and Jolie go ashore in Mersincik

The next morning, we were off again this time north on the wind to Cokertme which has several restaurants that offer free mooring, water and electric for simply coming to dinner.  Since we have to eat anyway, the opportunity to top up the batteries for free is welcome.

 

Docked at Capt. Ibrahim's

Docked at Capt. Ibrahim's

In Cokertme we had our first opportunity to see Turkish rugs being made by hand through every step–see July 1st post.  As much as we covet one, putting a beautiful hand made rug on the boat seems impractical.

Dinner ashore at Kaptan Ibrahim’s Restaurant included an mezza (traditional appetizers) buffet, and the usual fish and lamb courses. 

Twilight dinnertime at Capt. Ibrahim's

Twilight dinnertime at Capt. Ibrahim's

From Cokertme we headed east to Castle Island, a pristine little piece of sand that is a park and warrants its own post–see “Turkish Delight”.   We enjoyed Castle Island enough to spend two nights and then return for a third–it really is paradise.

 In between we spent two nights, including the July 4th holiday, at another restaurant location at Okluk in Degirmen Bay.  The Deniz Kizi Kaptan Restaurant was situated so far up the bay that it was like being in an inland lake.  With pine trees that line the shore, it reminds one of a lake in New Hampshire or the Basin in Maine.

Maine? New Hampshire lake? No. . .Turkey!

Maine? New Hampshire lake? No. . .Turkey!

You won't find mermaid sculptures in ME or NH either

You won't find mermaid sculptures in ME or NH either

Deniz Kizi Kaptan Restaurant--who knew Turkey would be so green

Deniz Kizi Kaptan Restaurant--who knew Turkey would be so green

We celebrated July 4th by dressing ship, although we had no fireworks this year unlike last when we were in Stromboli, Italy and the volcano provided our “fireworks” display. 

Sunset July 4th

Sunset July 4th

After two nights on the dock, some fine food, and spring water for our tanks, (great provisioning as well) we moved less than half a mile to English Harbor on the opposite side of the bay from Okluk for what we hoped would be a quiet night in an anchorage.  While it was fairly quiet, it wasn’t very private as there were 8 large gulets, one of which backed in right next to us just as we were starting dinner, and assorted private yachts all packed into the anchorage. 

Getting a little crowded in English Harbor

Getting a little crowded in English Harbor

English Harbor was a great place to swim and kayak.  One day trip boat dropped people into the water where they covered themselves with mud—interesting, but we did not try that.

 

Therapeutic mud?  Or drunk vacationers?

Therapeutic mud? Or drunk vacationers?

Although it was crowded, English Harbor did have two things we haven’t seen elsewhere.

A garbage boat that came along side to pick up trash.  We had none, having  just left a dock.

English Harbor has its own Garbarge Boat

English Harbor has its own Garbarge Boat

Sorry, we have no garbage today

Sorry, we have no garbage today

And a boat selling ice cream–now that we can use!!!

The ice cream man. . .

The ice cream man. . .

bringing Ben & Jerry's--the world is truly flat!

bringing Ben & Jerry's--the world is truly flat!

We’re back in Castle Island for more snorkeling before returning to Bodrum and completing a circle through the Gokova Gulf.

 The so-called Carian Coast stretches from north of Turgutreis, where we checked into Turkey, to Marmaris and includes the Boddrum and Datca Peninsulas which are separated by the Gokova Gulf. 

 Next stop will be the southern coast of the Datca Peninsula as we work our way to Marmaris.

 

More adventures to follow.

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