Home > Europe, Turkey > HERE THERE AND EVERY WHERE. . .IT’S HOT!

HERE THERE AND EVERY WHERE. . .IT’S HOT!

Turkey is a magnificent country, chock-a-block full of ancient sites and beautiful anchorages, but in the months of July and August it is HOT, and I do mean HOT!  In the past several weeks we have pretty much kept on the move from anchorage to anchorage, spending a few consecutive days at docks where we could plug in to power and run the A/C to get some relief from the heat.

Even a nice sailing day with wind on beam is HOT

Even a nice sailing day with wind on beam is HOT

It’s even too hot to blog—now that is HOT!  However, in an effort to keep you up-to-date on our travels I’ll give you a summary of where we have been.

From Knidos on the west end of the Datca Peninsula (see “Naked Aphrodite” post) we made a quick trip to the Town of Datca with the hope of salvaging my Acer web book that had crashed.  I was heartsick as thousands of pictures and other data were on the computer, not to mention all our contacts.  Luckily we found a replacement computer (with a Turkish keyboard—whole other story) and recovered the data from the hard drive.

Destiny in Datca with the A/C humming.

Destiny in Datca with the A/C humming.

Kent gets the new computer set up and running

Kent gets the new computer set up and running

We spent three nights in Datca, enjoyed air conditioning and had a lovely dinner on the beach.  Datca is a pretty little vacation town dominated by hotels and restaurants that line its beaches.  The town quay offers welcome shelter from the meltemi which was blowing while we were there.

Datca Quay is quite lovely

Datca Quay is quite lovely

From there we worked our way east along the southern shore of the Datca Peninsula, anchoring Kuru Buku and Kuyulu Buku before arriving in Keci Buku where we stayed several days.  “Buku” is Turkish for bay—and no two are the same, except for the number of gulets that fill them.  Heading east on the prevailing west wind we had a few nice sails in 20 kts. of wind.

Sunset at Kuyulu Buku--we were attacked by bees in this anchorage

Sunset at Kuyulu Buku--we were attacked by bees in this anchorage

The bees liked what we were having for dinner.

The bees liked what we were having for dinner.

The sand bar in Keci Buku is a popular place to cool off

The sand bar in Keci Buku is a popular place to cool off

We snorkled all around this island in Keci Buku and saw remnants of the old Fortress on the bottom

We snorkled all around this island in Keci Buku and saw remnants of the old Fortress on the bottom

From the town of Orhaniye, located on Keci Buku we took a dolmus (local bus) to Marmaris to check out the marinas there for possible winter storage.  We have pretty much decided that Destiny will winter at Marmaris Yacht Marina about 20 min. from the town.

Overlooking Marmaris

Overlooking Marmaris

It is quite common that restaurants located on the bays provide free docks, power and water to boats who patronize their restaurants.  Not a bad deal—you have to eat anyway, although we find that the cost of meals tends to be a little pricier to make up for the “free” stuff that accompanies it. If the restaurant has a swimming pool as well, you expect to pay more–but in this heat it is worth it. 

Orsay Restaurant Dock was pleasant. . .

Ersoy Restaurant Dock was pleasant. . .

but Iskele next door had a pool where Kent & Jolie could chill

but Iskele next door had a pool where Kent & Jolie could chill

Sunset at Iskele Restaurant, Keci Buku

Sunset at Iskele Restaurant, Keci Buku

After Keci Buku, we anchored for one night in Dirsek, but the heat got to us and we started hopping from restaurant dock to restaurant dock trying to keep cool.  The Greek island of Simi is a stone’s throw from Karaburun Point as we started back east toward Marmaris.

Rounding Karaburun Pt. Simi in Distance

Rounding Karaburun Pt. Simi in Distance

Unfortunately, Ali Baba Restaurant at Bozukkale had wonderful food but no power–so no A/C for us.  However, the location surrounded by towering cliffs and an nearly in tact fortress at the entrance to the harbor made up for the lack of A/C at least for one night.  The snorkeling was quite spectacular too.

Bozukkale Harbor from Fortress

Bozukkale Harbor from Fortress

Moonrise over Bozukkale Fortress

Moonrise over Bozukkale Fortress

Our next stop enroute to Marmaris was Alarga Sail Yacht Club in Ciftlik.  This “free” dock included not only water and power but a very classy resort, including swimming pool.  The outdoor restaurant overlooks the docks and there were comfortable lounge chairs for sunning as well.

Alarga Sail Yacht Club, Ciftlik

Alarga Sail Yacht Club, Ciftlik

The meltemi blew for about 36 hours, giving us an excuse to stay another day, and for the first time in a month since we arrived in Turkey, we had a little–and I do mean a “little”–rain.

Kent prepares for a welcome rain shower

Kent prepares for a welcome rain shower

Cliflik is a rather small harbor with steep cliffs around it and a beach that lines most of the shore making it an attractive spot for restaurants and hotels.

Hotel beach at Citflik

Hotel beach at Citflik

Early morning at Ciftlik is tranquil

Early morning at Ciftlik is tranquil

Just outside the entrance to Marmaris Harbor is a lovely little bay where we have spent several nights on a mooring–for free.  OK, so there is no power for A/C, but the swimming is quite nice and makes up for it.  Turunc is a lovely little holiday village with the usual restaurants, bars and ice cream stands.  It also has a very cool cave adjacent to one of the hotels that you can walk through to swim on either side of a peninsula.

Turunc cave

Turunc cave

View from beach at Turunc

View from beach at Turunc

Destiny moored off Turunc

Destiny moored off Turunc

Tomorrow we head for Yacht Marina in Marmaris where will possibly winter.  At least we’ll have A/C for a couple of days to cool off–and of course another restaurant and pool. 

We are told that the average temperature in Marmaris in August is 41 C. or about 94 F.–we won’t be staying long.

Categories: Europe, Turkey Tags:
  1. No comments yet.
  1. No trackbacks yet.