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COLD WATER BAY

September 20th, 2010 Leave a comment Go to comments

 

Coldwater Bay is barely visible behind boat at entrance

Cold Water Bay is barely visible behind boat at entrance

We recently spent a couple of lovely days in aptly named “Cold Water Bay” site of an underwater spring flowing from the mountain high above that keeps the water deliciously cool even in the heat of summer.  I say “summer” because September in Turkey in no way resembles the changes we experienced in New England this time of year. 

Beach at Coldwater Bay

Beach at Coldwater Bay

The days are getting shorter, and the temperature has moderated a little making September much like July or August in New England.  There are more clouds on the horizon, but still no rain and the days are 80 F. dropping to mid-60’s at night.  There is still some humidity and little wind but that doesn’t detract from the pleasant temperatures and refreshing swimming. 

Destiny moored in Coldwater Bay

Destiny moored in Coldwater Bay

Our pilot guide says that this “miniature” cove will accommodate 5 boats anchored and tied to shore, but that doesn’t take into account the ingenuity of the restaurant owner who advertises that it will accommodate 15 yachts.  Ali is quite the entrepreneur and has built his business based on “customer service”.  Since all his “customers” arrive on boats, that means greeting them by launch and offering to assist in tying to shore.  He is so adept at positioning boats that we did not see one crossed anchor in the time we were there. 

Ali directs boats in. . .while Kent watches our anchor.

Ali directs boats in. . .while Kent watches our anchor.

A few of the 16 boats at anchor one night--Ali out did himself!

A few of the 16 boats at anchor one night--Ali out did himself!

Of course, being the lovely setting it is and with the draw of the cold spring, tripper boats also converge on the cove with one or two at anchor throughout the day, only to be replaced by another one or two as those leave.  So for a portion of the day there is Euro rock or Turkish music blasting away as hordes of shrieking vacationers jump into the icy water or enter by water slide from the top deck of their tripper boat.  We found that was a great time to run our generator without disturbing boats nearby as the music and chatter drowned out the noise. 

Here comes another tripper boat

Here comes another tripper boat

 

Cold plunge off tripper boat

Cold plunge off tripper boat

The views from Ali’s restaurant and the trail that leads to the so-called “ghost town” of Kaya just over the ridge are spectacular. 

High above Coldwater Bay. . .

High above Coldwater Bay. . .

majestic views!

majestic views!

We undertook the hike to Kaya only to get lost and end up circling the entire cove before making our way back down the mountain to Destiny. 

On the trail to Kaya--or so we thought.

On the trail to Kaya--or so we thought.

Finally we come out near Destiny.

Finally we come out near Destiny.

There were wonderful views, but the steep trek took a toll on Kent’s knees and we decided that we would see Kaya by bus from Fethiye rather than make a second attempt to find it from the cove. 

Since the only way to reach Cold Water Bay is by boat, all the provisions for Ali’s restaurant have to be brought in my boat and carried up hill by donkey.  For most of the day the two donkeys that share this duty rest in the shade.

Donkeys rest during the heat of the day. . .

Donkeys rest during the heat of the day. . .

until the provision boat arrives late in the afternoon.

until the provision boat arrives late in the afternoon.

From Cold Water Bay we took a dinghy tour of Olu Deniz which is a nearly landlocked bay about 2 km away that prohibits boats with motors. 

Gulets anchor just outside Olu Deniz

Gulets anchor just outside Olu Deniz

This was once a favorite anchorage for boats, but pollution was destroying the bay.  In the early 80’s the Turkish government banned boats from anchoring in the bay and prohibited any craft powered by an engine. 

A floating barricade keeps all but small boats out

A floating barricade keeps all but small boats out

Kent rowed while Jolie and I rode

Kent rowed while Jolie and I rode

We rowed a short distance into the bay, which is now surrounded by beach clubs that do little to enhance the natural beauty of the place.  Whatever pollution was saved by keeping boats from anchoring has certainly been offset by the mega-development that lines the once pristine beach. 

People and umbrellas clog the beach

People and umbrellas clog the beach

Small boats are allowed in the bay as long as they are not engine powered

Small boats are allowed in the bay as long as they are not engine powered

Pedal power is OK too

. . .however, pedal power is OK.

The sky over Olu Deniz is crowded with parachutes that launch from the top of the 2000 meter (over 6,000 ft.) high mountain, Baba Dagi that soars upward from the beach.  We saw 15 or more parachutes drifting over the mountain at one time–the colorful canopies resembling large soaring birds.  The chutists ride the thermals high into the air, hover in many cases as though suspended in air and then gently float to a beach landing.

Baba Dagi looms over the beach below

Baba Dagi looms over the beach below

We saw 12-15 parachutes in the air at any given time

Riding a thermal high over the mountain ridge.

For about 60 euros you can do a tandem flight—very tempting—will keep you posted on that.

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