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KENT’S FIREY CLOSE SHAVE

For Christmas last year I bought Kent and Jolie a home hair cutting set, including electric clipper with various guide combs, scissors and even a cape.  Although we have used it several times, on both Kent and Jolie, I have to admit that the results are less than perfect.

When recently strolling through the myriad walkways of the Old Town of Marmaris a genial Turkish man “invited” Kent to have a Turkish haircut for “only ten lira”.  Since ten lira is about $6.50 US that seemed like a bargain, so into the chair he went for his first Turkish haircut.

Let me mention that Turkish men in general wear their hair very short, which appeals to Kent since he doesn’t like to spend money getting his hair cut in the first place, so he expects “his monies worth”.

The haircut was done by an affable Turkish 30-something who promised Kent that he would make him look 10 years younger.  Imagine, looking 10 years younger for only $6.50.  The haircut was done with only scissors, no electric clippers used here—the neckline and sideburns were trimmed with a straight razor.

Nice haircut, now for the "extras".

Nice haircut, now for the "extras".

Traditionally, a Turkish haircut should be accompanied by a shave—with lots of thick foam and a straight razor.  Kent balked a little at this suggestion, but I thought he should go for the “whole experience” even though it cost more. 

Lots of shaving cream. . .

Lots of shaving cream. . .

or every inch of beard.

for every inch of beard.

So he submitted to the closest shave of his life—followed by a gooey facial mask—that was guaranteed to take all those years off and make his face as soft as a baby’s bottom. 

The mask takes the years off. . .

The mask takes the years off. . .

and washes them down the drain.

and washes them down the drain.

Next,  he was subjected to one of the scariest hair removal techniques ever seen.  The barber put alcohol on a fluffy piece of cotton attached to a stick, set it on fire and then gently but firmly bounced the flaming cotton tip against Kent’s ears burning off any ugly hair that was needlessly aging him.  Kent describes the experience as “hair raising”, and particularly memorable for the smell of burning hair. 

Yikes, you're doing what!

Yikes, you're doing what!

So an hour and a half later, I have a husband with a face as soft as a baby’s bottom who looks ten years younger, according to everyone in the shop, including me.  With “extras” (shave, ear burning and mask) the cost is 30 Turkish lira—and a once in a lifetime experience. 

Oh yes, and he was back today for one more haircut on his 65th birthday but opted just for the haircut—which only took off 5 years according to his barber. 

HAPPY BIRTHDAY, DARLING–I don’t think you look a day over 55.

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