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TURKEY: ON THE HARD

November 24th, 2010 Leave a comment Go to comments

Just three days before Thanksgiving and about a month later than we left Croatia last year, Destiny is again on dry land and laid up for the winter at Marmaris Yacht Marina in Turkey.  The weather through November has been markedly warmer than Croatia in October. 

In turkey in November, hybiscus is still in bloom and palm trees sway in the breeze

In Turkey in November, hibiscus is still in bloom and palm trees sway in the breeze

The days are a balmy 75 F and at night a comfortable 50 F.  We can count on one hand the number of days that we have cranked up the heat to rid Destiny of an early morning chill, and have slept with the hatch in the master stateroom open most nights.  In the days leading up to our haul Kent worked ferverishly getting the boat ready.

Kent checked the rigging. . .

Kent checked the rigging. . .

and sanded. . .

and sanded. . . and taped. . .

 Then he applied cetol to the toe rail and strike rail.  No small job.

We have watched for the past two months as boats were hauled daily, sometimes until midnight and the parking areas no longer held cars but mega-yachts and more sailboats than we have seen on land in any one place in all our travels.  MYM has the capacity to store 1,000 boats on the hard, making it one of the largest in the entire Med. 

Mega-yachts. . .

Mega-yachts. . .

 

are supported by sticks and boards. . .we opted for a steel cradle.

are supported by sticks and boards. . .we opted for a steel cradle.

Parking lot is getting more crowded by the day.

Parking lot is getting more crowded by the day.

The yard has a 90 Ton (metric) lift and another that is 330 Ton—both working full-time.  Just days before we hauled a 100 plus foot sailing yacht came in for rigging work.  It took two cranes to remove and re-steep the mast and watching the work was a nail biter.

 

This mast goes on a very big sailboat

This mast goes on a very big sailboat

It takes two cranes several hours to step this mast

It takes two cranes several hours to step this mast

One step closer. . .

One step closer. . .

almost there. .

almost there. .

and now for the boom.

and now for the boom.

When our turn came we were lifted out by the 90 T travel lift, placed on a cradle and then towed on a special trailer to our winter storage spot—as requested near the restrooms. 

Destiny is dwarfed by the mega-yacht whose mast is taller than we are long!

Destiny is dwarfed by the mega-yacht whose mast is taller than we are long!

Destiny in the travel lift

Destiny in the travel lift

first a bath. . .

first a bath. . .

. . .then into the cradle

. . .then into the cradle

next the trailer. . .

next the trailer. . .

then off to our parking space.

then off to our parking space.

 Kent spent two full days covering the boat, which was tested last night by sustained 30 kt. winds and held.  We don’t know what will happen at 70 kts. which was recorded last year in January, but so far so good.

Jolie waits to get back on board.

Jolie waits to get back on board.

 After one night on the hard, and a beautiful sunrise, the weather deteriorated fast.  With rain approaching Kent worked very fast to cover Destiny.

Sunrise among the many masts.

Sunrise among the many masts.

Wind and rain threatened. . .

Wind and rain threatened. . .

but Kent got Destiny "buttoned up" in time.

but Kent got Destiny "buttoned up" in time.

But Jolie and I were hunkered out in one of the marina hotel rooms, attending to other important business.

Like getting all the boat yard dirt washed off. . .

Like getting all the boat yard dirt washed off. . .

and making her pretty to travel!

and making her pretty to travel!

Tomorrow is Thanksgiving and we will be enroute to Istanbul first thing in the morning.  No turkey on our agenda this year, but much to be thankful for.

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